And I’m currently looking for one. The Hog went DOWN. The rebounding hammer leaves one with a very heavy trigger pull.). I can hit fastest with a scoped bolt action, so I use a 308 if the law allows. Will not touch a foreign made gun. The most recent copy I saw was pretty nice. But for those of us that can tame the beast, it can be a deeply enjoyable experience as well as being the ultimate companion for those long hunts far away from home. 8605 very good bullet. If you want to get into a .44 Magnum carbine cheap, look for a used Rossi R92 in .44 magnum. Now that we know a little more about the round though, its time to look into what you can hunt with it. • .243 Winchester• .338 Winchester Magnum• .357 S&W Magnum• 6.5-284 Norma• 8x57 Mauser• .38 Smith & Wesson Special• 7x57mm Mauser• 9 mm Luger• .35 Whelen• .454 Casull• .375 H&H Magnum• .45 Colt• .22-250 Remington• 10mm Auto• .308 Winchester, E-mail your comments/questions about this site to: [email protected], For questions/comments about American Hunter magazine, please e-mail:[email protected], You can contact the NRA via phone at: NRA Member Programs1-800-672-3888, To advertise on American Hunter, visit nramediakit.com for more information. No lightning clones? Jeez, an 1892 carbine in .45 LC would stupid ROCK! ; the .334 OKH (O’Neill-Hopkins-Keith) cartridge had a direct and irrefutable influence on the development of the .338 Win. I have also shot a number of deer with .44 magnum handguns. Years back I bought a Win ’94 Trapper (16″ bbl) in .44 mag (sans safety) and had a good smith convert it to takedown.

16″ barrel, holds 7 in the tube and weighs 5.7lb’s if I remember right. The longer barrel makes a gun heavier, and the weight of the 6-inch revolver will tame the recoil better compared to that of a lighter, shorter barrel revolver.

We’ve had carbines vs. rifles going back to the Civil War. The plans are still available in one of the old NRA gunsmith publications. over 50 yards away, it make perfect sense to get a carbine that can shoot the same round. inside of 50 yards, the .44 is the better overall caliber. I also have the equivalent Rossi rifle which is nearly indistinguishable from the H&R. both in a handgun as well as a rifle. I have also shot a number of deer with .44 magnum handguns. The Henry’s are OK, but not as good as the Marlins (both old and newer). The Model 44, which has a closed received and tubular magazine, is a bit more common on the used market (it was in production for longer) but parts are hard to come by, so tread carefully. If you insist on nothing but the best in lever guns, Winchester – of course – still makes the Model 1892.

Mike has had my .308 for 20+ years. There are traditional copper-jacketed hollowpoints—making a great choice for a defensive round—as well as modern homogenous metal bullets like the Barnes XPB, giving a modern twist on an old favorite.

This will never be the case with any revolver that has a scope mounted to it (unless it’s a revolver rifle, like the Rossi Circuit Judge briefly mentioned above).

(Re: Socialist Utopian police-state) So NO…I think muskets are still ok, after an extensive months long UBC/Permit process….Maybe….Then there’s still sticks and stones…. Since the .44 Magnum is a revolver cartridge, there are a ton of revolver options on the market for this round. Two bears charging from 10 yards way would probably not allow a reload of either a revolver, or a tube fed carbine. It's old enough to have a four digit serial number. has a well-deserved place among the most effective developments for a revolver, and will undoubtedly remain there for our lifetime and beyond. A 180 grain, 0.43 inch diameter bullet exiting the muzzle at 1,600 fps or better will immediately drop every human being on the face of the planet.

I prefer handguns for a first line of defense home weapon, but the weapon I would retreat to if the SHTF is a Marlin 336BL (18.5″) loaded with Federal 125gr SJHPs. The M-14 had a 22″ barrel length. Forget pistol caliber carbines, upgrade to a rifle cartridge pistol. Its been well received and tested by numerous YouTube gun gurus…If I could in my STATE. Thus, in general, the longer a bullet spends time inside the barrel, the more time it has to accelerate from the pressures caused by the combustion of the powder charge from the cartridge. Just more low value crap instead of reasoned writing.

Meanwhile, I will stick with my Winchester in .45 Colt with a 24″ barrel that holds 13+1.

Terrific guns that trouble free and good in Cowboy Action Shooting or just shooting for fun. http://www.winchesterguns.com/content/dam/winchester-repeating-arms/products/rifles/model-1892/carbine/Winchester%20Model%201892%20Carbine%20-%20534177141.jpg/_jcr_content/renditions/cq5dam.web.835.835.jpeg, https://www.classicfirearms.com/cva-cp701s-scout-v2-lr-pistol-14/. Trade it off on a Marlin or a Henry. The Ruger 99 Semi Auto is the Deerfield. great deer gun, but low round count. To me, that says modern. ", I kill elk with my Model 94 Marlin 44 mag, so I am pretty sure it would kill deer.

Uh, 18 to 20″ barrel lengths are carbines. For me, that's 40m with a revolver and 100m with a rifle. When it comes to hunting elk, it is well debated whether the .44 Magnum is a good round. .

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Thanks for reading guys and remember to stay safe and protect your ears when shooting. The 1892 is a top-ejector, so no optics. I personally, like the Challenge of hunting with a one-shot rifle. Rimfire, link no workee other than providing a pic identical to the one I got goggling Winchester to look it up, where that pic is above a description of the 1892 carbine including the fact that it is .357 only. But as revolvers, they have an inherent disadvantage due to their design. Like most any caliber with a proper bullet, hit the CNS you get a bang-flop, hit the heart/lungs they run a little ways and drop. I demand a great affordable pump gun be made you know when a manufacturer gets around to it if it’s financially feasible. The whole “carry the same pistol caliber as your carbine” argument notwithstanding. Matthew Collins is a writer, editor, competitive shooter, hobby-level gunsmith and general firearms enthusiast. I also have a 16″ barrel, lightly built carbine that when I put a stout load down the barrel it really jumps. There are three models, two with synthetic stocks (blued or stainless receiver) and a walnut-stocked model with a blued receiver. 44 magnum model 94 ( End of the trail model)out of the Winchester plant. . I’ll take one over a shotgun any day. The reason why the .44 Magnum round gets slightly higher velocities and generates more muzzle energy out of an 8.375-inch barrel revolver (only 2 inches longer than standard hunting revolver barrel lengths) is because the longer barrel length gives the slow-burning powder (the type of powder charge typical big-bore magnum revolver rounds typically use) more time to burn. . It's old enough to have a four digit serial number.

At least mine is. Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.7.3. Had a 788 carbine in .308 and rifle.223. He was head down, rooting when his shoulder was broken. Within 100+/- yards, I have never had a problem killing whitetails with Remington 240 grain factory ammo from my Ruger 44 International carbine. First is the Marlin 1894. I got rid of both Winchesters and have never regretted it. But you get a 20-inch barrel, blued steel finish with walnut stock and furniture, 10 rounds on tap in the magazine, and Winchester’s attention to fit and finish. Keith had a penchant for handguns that improved upon the existing cartridges and their performance.

Not much good to say about it. I shoot the Hornady 240 XTP's out of my Ruger Super Redhawk and I REALLY like them. I don’t spend enough time in gun stores to know if Marlin has substantially upped their game in the last couple years, but last time I got the lever gun itch every Marlin in the store was a complete POS. I really enjoy my pump/slide action IMI Timberwolves, even if they kick a little harder.

yeah on that vein the IMI timberwolf was a good little gun. If Ruger cleaned up the trigger a bit, they’d be a pretty popular rifle, IMO.

And stay in touch with newsletters of our best articles on techniques, guns, & gear. Seems weird. Heck, I’d buy one of those rifles, too if Ruger came back out with it. Another consideration is the length of time it takes to reload.

Rifles, by virtue of their longer barrel, can push any cartridge to its maximum ballistics potential. The rotary magazine holds four rounds, and has an 18.5-inch barrel. And 300 grain bullets are available.

If you happen to own a .44 Magnum revolver it and you’re looking to hunt deer from farther than what your revolver allows, i.e. recoil was essentially the same to me. Mag. I would like to have a Ruger 77/44, but not for $900.00 purchase price. Regardless of your exact load, 8 or more rounds of .44 Magnum in a lever-action rifle is a seriously formidable firearm platform for home defense.

You do not pay anything extra and your purchase helps support my work in bringing you more awesome gun and gear articles. Here’s the link: http://www.winchesterguns.com/content/dam/winchester-repeating-arms/products/rifles/model-1892/carbine/Winchester%20Model%201892%20Carbine%20-%20534177141.jpg/_jcr_content/renditions/cq5dam.web.835.835.jpeg. Sound off in the comments! Notify me of follow-up comments by email. On average, a good lever-action revolver-caliber rifle (or carbine, a rifle with a relatively shorter barrel) will cost anywhere from $800 up to $2,000 depending on brand, make and model. And it would help reduce muzzle blast and preserve your hearing.

Further on the rifle stocks bit — with .44 Magnum revolvers that have a mounted scope, it’ll be a lot harder to aim through it because you have to hold it with both hands an arm’s length away from your eyes.eval(ez_write_tag([[250,250],'gunnewsdaily_com-medrectangle-4','ezslot_5',130,'0','0']));eval(ez_write_tag([[250,250],'gunnewsdaily_com-medrectangle-4','ezslot_6',130,'0','1'])); With rifles, not only does the butt of stock let you handle recoil better by distributing recoil forces evenly on your firing shoulder, it also allows for a better aiming stance because you can naturally rest your cheek on the stock. An example from the past: Springfield Trapdoor “rifles” had a barrel length over 32″, and the “carbine” length had a barrel length of 22″ or so.

Whitetail deer, for example, will fall to a 300 grain round easily.



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